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Scary Never Looked So Good

By Daniel Copley, Digital Editor | Oct 2015

We’re about to give you a lesson in abject horror (nope, not your dad in a pair of our super spray-ons) as we’ve resurrected literature’s greatest and grizzliest monstrosities for AW15. We didn’t want to do the same old thing for Halloween, so we’ve imagined what our favourite fictional bad guys – from Dracula to Patrick Bateman – would be shopping at Topman this season. Muahahahahaha.

frankenstein’s monster

Frankenstein’s Monster

In 1818, Mary Shelley brought literature’s first zombie (of sorts) to life. The monster was described by his creator, Victor Frankenstein, in the following glowing terms:

 

“His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes…his shriveled complexion and straight black lips”

 

Frankenstein’s monster would likely be slightly self-conscious when it comes to his personal style, which is perfectly fair enough, seeing as he’s a hideous patchwork aberration. So he’d probably opt for a subtle, autumnal crew neck and pared-down denim.

 

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count dracula

Count Dracula

The world’s most famous bloodsucker first appeared in Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel. Here’s how he is described by protagonist, Jonathan Harker:

 

“His face was a strong, a very strong, aquiline, with high bridge of the thin nose and peculiarly arched nostrils, with lofty domed forehead.  The mouth…was fixed and rather cruel-looking, with peculiarly sharp white teeth.”

 

But what would The Count wear in 2015? Well, he’d probably be bang on trend for one thing – we reckon he’d rock black-on-black and a directional ribbed cape.

 

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Patrick Bateman

The coolest fictional sadist of all time? Most probably. American Psycho was written in the first person, so here’s how Patrick Bateman views himself:

 

“I had all the characteristics of a human being—flesh, blood, skin, hair—but my depersonalization was so intense, had gone so deep, that my normal ability to feel compassion had been eradicated, the victim of a slow, purposeful erasure. I was simply imitating reality, a rough resemblance of a human being, with only a dim corner of my mind functioning”

 

The coolest man on Wall Street during the 80s, today Bateman would lose the silk ties and shoulder pads and bring power dressing into the 21st century in a twill skinny three-piece suit.

 

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Patrick Bateman
hannibal lecter

Hannibal Lecter

Everybody’s favourite genius cannibal was introduced in the 1981 novel, Red Dragon, but it’s in Silence of the Lambs that Lecter was at his creepy best:

 

"Lecter is never outside his cell without wearing full restraints and a mouthpiece…on the afternoon of July 8, 1976, he complained of chest pain, his restraints were removed to make it easier to give him an electrocardiogram. When the nurse bent over, he did this to her…the doctors managed to save one of her eyes…he broke her jaw and got to her tongue. His pulse never got over eighty-five, even when he swallowed it.”

 

Lecter’s appetite for utilitarian menswear (amongst other things) has been influenced by years in padded cells and solitary confinement. He’d look great in this season’s emerging trend, the boiler suit.

 

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Mr Hyde

When Dr Jeykll sipped his potion in 1886 he became Mr Hyde, the personification of human cruelty mixed with repressed Victorian sexual anxieties. In other words, a bad man who did bad things. Here’s how Utterson, the novel’s amiable lawyer, talks of him:

 

“Mr. Hyde was pale and dwarfish, he gave an impression of deformity without any nameable malformation, he had a displeasing smile…he spoke with a husky, whispering and somewhat broken voice”

 

Proving that evil is no barrier to great style, we think that for Mr Hyde would be all over the camel overcoat for AW15 – ideal for stalking the streets of late night London. 

 

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Mr hyde
All illustrations by Nathan James Page
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